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poetry circle

One Page Poetry Circle Archive

 

Welcome to the One Page Poetry Circle at St. Agnes Branch Library!
Date: Tuesday, September 9
Time: 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Place: St. Agnes Branch Library, 444 Amsterdam Avenue (near 81st Street), 3rd Floor
Theme: Poetry and Cats and Dogs (pdf)

Find a poem! Read a poem! Discuss a poem!

We’re back for the seventh season of the One Page Poetry Circle where people gather to examine the works of established poets. While there is no instructor and this is not a workshop for personal writing, once a month OPPC gives everyone a place to become teachers and learners to explore the form, content, language and meaning of poetry. By our calculation, OPPC participants have read and discussed about 750 poems since the circle started.

Join the circle on September 9 to discuss Poetry and Cats and Dogs.

Type “dog and cat poems” into google, and you are sure to be overwhelmed by bad poetry. People of all sorts are devoted to their pets, luckily including great poets. Thomas Gray wrote about the ironic death of his cat, “Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes,” while Thomas Hardy wrote “Last Words to a Dumb Friend” celebrating the life of his cat. After his death Thomas Hardy’s heart was to be buried where he lived while his cremains were placed in the Poet’s Corner of Westminster Abbey. A cat got into the house and ate the heart so the undertaker killed the culprit and put the cat (containing Hardy’s heart) in Hardy’s grave.

Not all dog and cat poems need be sentimental. Billy Collins has written a few poems from a dog’s point of view, including “The Revenant” which begins:

  • I am the dog you put to sleep,
  • As you like to call the needle of oblivion,
  • Come back to tell you this simple thing:
  • I never liked you – not one bit.

One of the most famous groups of poems about cats is T.S. Eliot’s 1939 publication, Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, in which Eliot reminds us, “A CAT IS NOT A DOG.” This book, of course, went on to become the basis of the musical Cats (now and forever). We’ve posted Elliot’s “Invitation to Pollicle Dogs and Jellicle Cats” the fantasy that inspired Eliot’s poetry on the subject, on our blog (http://onepagepoetrycircle.wordpress.com/).

We look forward to seeing old friends and new on September 9 to discuss Poetry and Cats and Dogs. You are welcome to bring a poem about one or the other – it doesn’t have to be about both!

Here’s the fall lineup:

September 9: Poetry and Cats and Dogs
October 14: Poetry and the Ode
November 4: Poetry and Politics
December 9: Poetry and Drink

Bring a friend and widen the circle!

And remember to blog with us at onepagepoetrycircle.wordpress.com. Don’t be shy.

Abigail Burnham Bloom and
AnnaLee Wilson

The One Page Poetry Circle is sponsored by the New York Public Library and is open to all. St. Agnes Branch Library is handicap accessible.

 


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